What Now?

Try to remind yourself that what happened to you is not your fault. And know that you don’t have to take this journey alone. Navigating your next steps as a survivor may be difficult, but you have options. If you are unsure of what to do, look through some of your options below to better understand what each process may look like. You can change your mind about reporting your abuse, but your options for a legal remedy may be limited by state laws including the Statute of Limitations.

Note: Each case is different and depends upon the date of offense or offenses, where the perpetrator has been living, the law in your state at the time of offense, and changes that may have occurred since this writing. Explore the Statute of Limitations with law enforcement, prosecution and or civil attorneys.

REPORTING AS AN ATHLETE

If you participate in a sport organization that is a member of a national governing body recognized by the U.S. Olympic Committee and you need to make a report, click here to fill out the Sexual Misconduct Incident Reporting Form sent to SafeSport. Learn more here about what happens after you report here.

If you are in a sports organization unaffiliated with a national governing body, ask the organization its policies and procedures and familiarize yourself with its specific mechanisms for reporting abuse.

REPORTING AS A MAN

Men who are sexually abused or assaulted may feel especially isolated or alone. Know that we and many others stand with you. Some feel a social stigma around male sexual abuse and assault, and a lot of this comes from lack of awareness and understanding about the effects of the experience and what is needed to move forward. Studies have found that one in six men experience sexual violence, and you are far from the only man to experience this. These resources are geared specifically for you. Check out more information here.

NO MATTER WHAT YOU DECIDE TO DO, WE RECOMMEND THAT YOU:

1. CONSIDER TELLING A SUPPORT PERSON YOU TRUST.

What if the person I told wasn’t supportive? Click here.

2. SEEK PROFESSIONAL MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT.

Note: Psychotherapists (therapists, and psychologists) are mandatory reporters. If you are a minor, elder, or a person with a disability, or you report feeling suicidal or have certain kinds of injuries, the provider may be obligated to breach confidentiality. It’s not a reason to avoid seeking care, of course, but it is important to note the privacy implications of seeking care.

3. SEEK MEDICAL TREATMENT.

Heal injuries that may need immediate attention

Seek follow up care and preventative treatment for STIs, pregnancy, and other needs that require consistent follow up.

4. PRACTICE SELF-CARE.

We are not lawyers, and the information on this website does not constitute legal advice. The information on this website in no way creates an attorney-client relationship between The Army of Survivors, its employees, board members, or other affiliates. We encourage you to contact a lawyer to discuss your complaint or potential lawsuit.